I'm writing to announce a Walk-In-related event to be held from Noon to 2pm on Monday, November 4  at the Cupola of East Carolina University. I attach a flyer for the event.

We'd be happy to have our event added to your list of Walk-In events supporting public education in North Carolina. 

Best,
Dr. John Steen
Department of English, ECU

rally_flyer_nov_4.pdf
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Pulled from the Facebook event page:
Well worth the read!

20 years of teaching. I've held pressure on puncture wounds and cuts of "free bleeders". Held hands of kids having panic attacks, asthma attacks and freshly broken bones. Made make shift splints for said bones. Held the heads of kids having seizures-grand mal and petit. Recognized the latter in more than one child before the parents even knew. I've called 911 for over-doses and referred dozens of depressed kids to counselors preventing the unthinkable from happening. Even rode with a child to the hospital in an ambulance when we couldn't reach a family member and signed for her admittance (during my planning period). I've talked gang members down from a fight, taken my share of cigarettes and tobacco. I've helped kids out of homes where they were physically abused, sexually abused and neglected to the point of not eating for days. I've huddled with scared kids during a tornado, I've locked them and hidden them from intruders during a lock down, I've gotten them safely from a building on fire. No real teacher would dare tell you that their job is "more important" than yours because real teachers see the value of every job and how they are all connected. I wake up at 5:00, leave my own child sleeping in bed, so I can get to work by 6:30. I then work every single minute (which I've very carefully planned out) of the day with the exception of the time it takes to walk down the hall to use the bathroom twice a day and the time it takes to grab the drink and pack of crackers I brought for lunch-which I eat at my desk while I work. I leave, sprinting, at 4:30 to pick up my child by 5:00. I then spend 1-2 hours grading papers and responding to/sending emails for work at home. Saturdays up at 5:30 work as long as I can (the last 2 its been 10 hours). Sundays, Barnes and Noble from 10-2 or 3. I worked 60-70 hours a week in September and brought home $2194. The same amount I have for (is it 5 or 6 years now...I've lost count). This Summer, during my "time off" I had to write the curriculum for a subject I currently teach because the state doesn't have one. I attended technology training. I searched for resources and studied the content of my new subject. I didn't get paid for any of that. I'm salaried...10 months a year. I teach 85 kids a day for whom I am held accountable (and must maintain and document their attendance, grades, communication with their parents, behavior, remediation efforts as well as any special accommodations) and from whose performance I am evaluated. I am teaching science with a textbook that was written before Al Gore told the world about global warming and about the same time the International space station was in its beginning stages. My school gives us $100 for supplies for the year (and that's twice what most here get). Everywhere I turn I am reading more and more people slamming my profession. "Ten months a year", "glorified babysitters", "Replaceable", "Being self centered", "greedy", "not thinking about the kids", "unqualified"...I mean, we are pretty much being portrayed as, treated as and paid as the most unprofessional of professions yet the expectations and liabilities that we are entrusted with continue to grow??? Nothing about it even makes sense. Makes this old dog think since that's what (and how much) the general public ( and state and local government) think of us then having all NC teachers walk out really won't be too big of a shock, just what is expected of a lazy bunch of do - nothings. Truth is, most won't. For various reasons. Government knows it. But I gotta say, if we do nothing...nothing will change. (laws of motion and force tend to trump the laws of man).
 
 

Does anyone know exactly how many teachers NC has? I am disappointed in the lack of media coverage, low numbers of participants and FaceBook followers. These numbers should be much higher. Everyone complains, but not everyone wants to stick their neck out for change. We all need our jobs, I get that! But make a post, write a letter, call the media, do something! I've contacted CNN, NY Times, 5 local TV and radio programs, 5 local newspapers and forwarded links to everyone I know. Still, there is little coverage. Why is everyone so scared? If we press hard enough McCrory might "find" $10 million more in the budget and give us a $5 raise!

-Teacher

Fayetteville